Albert Abramowitz

Albert Abramowitz (Russian and American, 1879–1963) was born in Riga, Russia (now Latvia).  He studied art at the Imperial Art School in Odessa and at the Académie de la Grande Chaudière in Paris. He became a member of the Paris Salon in 1911 and of its jury in 1913. He also became a member of the Societaire du Salon d'Automne and won widespread recognition and acclaim, including the Grand Prize at the 1911 Universal Exposition in Rome and Turin. 

Abramowitz immigrated in America in 1916. He had a 1921 solo exhibition at the Civic Club in Manhattan. In the late 20s he lived in Los Angeles, but eventually returned to the east coast and settled in Brooklyn. He exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago (1938, 1940), Union of American Artists (1940), American Artists Congresses exhibition (In Defense of Culture, 1941), ACA Galleries (Artists in the War, 1942), New-Age Gallery (1943, 1946), National Academy of Design (1946), and American Association of University Women (1946).

Abramowitz’s wood engravings are often socially and politically oriented. Many of Abramowitz’s works are of a Jewish theme. He produced eighteen prints for the Federal Arts Projects in New York between 1935 and 1939. His works are in the collections of the British Museum, the Library of Congress, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the New York Public Library, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the Jewish Museum.

Worry by Albert Abramowitz

Worry by Albert Abramowitz

Head of a Jew by Albert Abramowitz

Head of a Jew by Albert Abramowitz